Uxmal, Photo of Nunnery Quadrangle

The Ballcourt

The path from the Nunnery Quadrangle to the House of the Turtles and Governor's Palace runs through a small Ballcourt. The Ballcourt is believed to date from around 905 AD.

"Ballcourts are an exciting and noteworthy feature of the Maya area's archaeological scene..increasingly understood as prime areas for exciting rubber ball games and imposing ritual-political performance".

Olivier de Montmollin, A Regional Study of Classic Maya Ballcourts from the upper Grijalva Basin, Chiapas, Mexico, p. 1


Uxmal, Ballcourt

The ring attached to the ballcourt wall is a copy of one of the stone rings originally found here. It contains hieroglyphic dates which have various readings, but generally the Ballcourt is believed to date to around 905 AD and to have been built by Lord Chac.


Uxmal, Ballcourt

Parts of a feathered serpent have been reassembled at the side of the ballcourt.

The Feathered Serpent is identified with the central American cult of Quetzalcoatl/Kukulkan, and it may reflect the influence of Chichen Itza on Lord Chac's building campaign.


Uxmal, Ballcourt

The rattle from the serpent's tail is still attached to the Ballcourt wall.


Uxmal, Ballcourt

Additional fragments of intertwining feathered-serpent body parts line the ballcourt playing alley.


Uxmal, Ballcourt

The Ballcourt, with House of the Turtles and Palace of the Governor in Background. It has been speculated that, since there is no spectator seating within the ballcourt itself, games might have been viewed from the platform of the Governor's Palace or the House of the Turtles, or, on the opposite end, from the platform supporting the Nunnery Quadrangle.